Skip to content

ARQUISTE Orange Blossom & Iris Hand Sanitiser

Sold out
$45.00
Availability: translation missing: en.general.icons.icon_check_circle icon Out of stock

Part Payments Options through Afterpay, Laybuy or Zip at checkout.

Notify me when back in stock

NEW! Orange Blossom & Iris Hand Sanitiser

Lightly scented and with a moisturising solution, this hand sanitiser is created around two Italian essences, Sicilian orange blossom and Tuscan Iris, inspired by the Boboli Gardens in Florence.  Meets CDC hand-washing recommendations in the absence of water.  

Alcohol Antiseptic 80% / Topical / Non-sterile solution

Responsibly sourced, even the bottles are recycled from beach collected plastic. The fragrance formula is clean, vegan and paraben free. Made in New York.

70 ml / 2.30 fl oz. Travel size. 

 

History

May 1778, Boboli Gardens, Florence.

Spring has exploded in the Boboli Gardens and the budding scent of orange blossom hangs lightly in the air. Built by architect Zanobi del Rosso during the Habsburg-Lorraine age, the elegant Limonaia, or Lemon House, has over 500 pots of ancient and rare citrus trees. Blended with clary sage and lavender, as well as precious Tuscan iris root, their redolent scent is as light and airy as the gardens’ courtly spirit.

 

TOP NOTES

Orange blossom

Lemon leaves

Bitter orange

 

HEART NOTES

Clary sage

French lavender

Blackcurrant bud absolute

 

BASE NOTES

Tuscan iris

Angelica root

Ambrette seed

 

Further Description

Alcohol Antiseptic 80% / Topical / Non-sterile solution. Meeting OSHA Bloodborne Pathogens Standard 1910.1030 and CDC hand-washing recommendations in the absence of water. 

 

Responsibly sourced. Plastic spray bottle recycled from beach collected plastic. The Orange Blossom & Iris fragrance formula is clean, vegan and paraben free. Made in New York.

70 ml / 2.30 fl oz. Travel size. 

 

More research

- The Limonaia was built between 1777 and 1778, after a design by Zanobi del Rosso in the location of the former Menagerie erected by Grand Duke Cosimo III de’ Medici in 1677 and dismantled by Grand Duke Peter Leopold Habsburg-Lorraine in 1776. The construction of the Lemon House became necessary as the collection of citrus trees expanded. 

- The left side of the Lemon House was enlarged in 1816 by Giuseppe Cacialli to create a space equal in width to two windows. Cacialli also oversaw the construction of a small room on the same side, designed for use as a storage for material and equipment with an office annex for the Head Gardener (“Scrittoio del Giardiniere”). This room preserves the late eighteenth-century cabinets which were once used to display a collection of citrus casts. Cacialli was also entrusted with the Neoclassical design of the two wings’ façades, which form the edge of the garden to the right and left.

- The area below the Lemon House consists of a garden with four large flowerbeds designed for growing roses. Along the wall at the base, there are various parterres originally conceived to propagate plants. The garden is closed off by two high walls which line the boulevard.